Welcome!


Welcome to the Stickley Museum at Craftsman Farms!  This 30-acre National Historic Landmark is the centerpiece of Gustav Stickley’s early 20th century country estate.  Stickley was a major figure in the American Arts and Crafts movement who combined the roles of designer, manufacturer, architect, publisher, philosopher, and social critic.  The Arts and Crafts movement represented more than a beautiful sense of style, design and craftsmanship. Theories and dreams abounded, too. The movement is inseparable from the social, civic and economic reforms and experiments that occurred at the same time.  Indeed, his massive Log House stands not only as a house that briefly became home to Gustav Stickley and his family, but also as a symbol of an important dream. 


Stickley’s own writings suggest that for him the home is the alpha and omega of human existence: 

“It is my own wish, my own final ideal, that the Craftsman house may so far as possible...be instrumental in helping to establish in America a higher ideal, not only of beautiful architecture, but of home life.” 

In creating Craftsman Farms, an even larger idea was as important to him as the house and its grounds — a utopian vision of the right way to live. We invite you to step into this utopian setting, learn about Stickley's dreams, and experience first-hand, all that the Stickley Museum at Craftsman Farms has to offer.  It is a place like no other.

15 December 2019

 

 

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Important Message for the Stickley Museum at Craftsman Farms Community:
Sat., Dec. 7, 2019

 

Dear Friends,

Earlier this week, a ransomware attack was launched on the museum's office computer system. In a desire to be transparent, we are making you aware of this attack, which has devastated our administrative record-keeping. While this attack encrypted our office computers, servers, and back-ups, the nature of the information stored on those systems limits the potential exposure of sensitive information. In particular, donors should be aware that the museum does not store Personally Identifiable Information (PII), such as credit card numbers, on its office computer system or on any data storage device...


Read our complete Public Statement